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cortonwood: the shearer haulage chain was always,simply,the 'hauler' chain where I've worked,. Jan 30, 2014 13:50:23 GMT -5
bob737: The common name'Panzer' for the AFC originated as the German word for armoured conveyor, 'Panzerf├Ârderer'. The pans were 1.5m (4ft 11.04ins) & not 5ft as was commonly thought...[br] Feb 1, 2014 5:53:57 GMT -5
smshogun: Crawley, Armoured Face Conveyor, chain, panzer, AFC, snaker. Feb 7, 2014 21:19:28 GMT -5
John: A "bagging in yorkshire, is a hose in most places, "codger end" Geordie for a return/tail roller on a conveyor. First time I heard "shifter" was in North Yorks, term for an adjustable spanner, stuck with me even now stateside.. Feb 9, 2014 10:29:56 GMT -5
John: Was even "shifter" in Oz!! Feb 9, 2014 10:30:33 GMT -5
cortonwood: when I worked at barnburgh colliery a load binder was called a 'way,way willy'(not sure if I've spelled it right,but that's what they called them. Feb 20, 2014 17:36:52 GMT -5
rac: wee way in Derbyshire (if I've spelt it right also) Feb 23, 2014 15:01:15 GMT -5
dintheader: Anyone collect pit checks?? Feb 25, 2014 4:43:36 GMT -5
cortonwood: hi rac,it might have been wee way at barnburgh come to think of it Feb 25, 2014 12:26:36 GMT -5
dintheader: Enter your reply here...Was a wey wey at Barnburgh although i suspect its spelled weigh weigh Feb 26, 2014 8:56:40 GMT -5
rac: was pronounced "wee way" but you know what thick miners were-probably spelt differently ha ha Feb 27, 2014 15:44:55 GMT -5
dintheader: Load binder, that settles it!!! lol Mar 2, 2014 5:32:26 GMT -5
dintheader: Pit checks,anyone swapping? i have spares from Inghams Thornhill, Brookhill, Clifton(Lancs), Denaby Main Deep, Cannock & Rudgely deep seam Mar 2, 2014 5:36:09 GMT -5
John: Back when I were a young apprentice, our load binders were known as bell wire, pit would have been screwed without rolls and rolls of bellwire... Mar 12, 2014 17:16:51 GMT -5
John: To the uninitiated, Bell Wire was galvanized fencing wire, got it's name from it's use as bare signal wire on manriders and rope haulages. Mar 12, 2014 17:18:28 GMT -5
rac: yeh you're right john used for every thing from hanging armoured cable to securing tackle on trams very useful stuff!! the solid stuff better than the stranded though Mar 13, 2014 14:35:59 GMT -5
John: Hanging cables with it would have been illegal rac, Inspector would have blown his top!! The correct hangers were designed to give if a fall or tension came onto the cable. Mar 13, 2014 17:03:46 GMT -5
rac: know what you mean John but i'm talking about the period before the galvanised steel hangers came into use---for years we used bell wire along with the strips of belting (with eyelets in)when they were available failing that just bell wire-miles hung!! Mar 14, 2014 13:38:30 GMT -5
John: I recall some canvas types, can't remember how they were strung up now, just too many years back, but the mild steel ones that had a wing nut and clamp to fasten them on the rings were common in the 60's. Mar 14, 2014 16:26:18 GMT -5
John: We used an approved twine in Australia, problem was, if two or three decided to break, hundreds of yards of cable would be on the floor, not something the engineer or Inspector like...Mind you, it was 11Kv cable. Mar 14, 2014 16:28:26 GMT -5